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Supplementum Epigraphicum Graecum: 60.1569


TREATY BETWEEN THE LYCIANS AND TERMESSOS BY OINOANDA


Greek text:   SEG_60.1569
Provenance:   Xanthos , Lycia
Date:   c. 160-150 B.C.
Tags:     treaties-cities
Format:   see key to translations

The city of Termessos by Oinoanda - often abbreviated to just Oinoanda - was probably founded in the Hellenistic period by colonists from Termessos in Pisidia, and it had a variable relationship with the rest of Lycia. Soon after this treaty it formed a tetrapolis with three other local cities ( see OGIS 762.B ), and over a century later it became a formal member of the Lycian League.

This inscription was published with a French translation and full commentary by D.Rousset, "De Lycie en Cabalide: la convention entre les Lyciens et Termessos près d'Oinoanda" ( 2010 ).  There is a useful English summary in the review of his book by R.M.Errington ( Bryn Mawr Classical Review ).



When Harpalos was priest of the goddess Roma for the league of the Lycians, and Alkimos was priest of Apollo, on the 21st day of the month of Daisios; and as is reckoned in Termessos by Oinoanda, when Trokondas son of Diogenes - but by adoption son of Kbainis the son of Trokondas the son of Diogenes - was priest of Zeus, and Komon his son was priest of the goddess Roma, in year 34 on the 18th day of the month of Daisios.   On these terms an agreement was composed 10 between the Lycians, acting through their appointed men, namely:

and the citizens of Termessos by Oinoanda, acting through the men they sent, namely:

The Termessians have agreed that the decisions and their results, which were made in the city of Kos, shall be binding.

The Tloans and the Karyandians shall have the right of transit, concerning which the Termessians made an accusation against them.

Mount Masa shall belong to the Tloans. The Termessians shall have the right of grazing and collecting wood on it for all time, 30 but they shall not be permitted to build on it, or to plant or sow anything. The aforesaid mountain has been demarcated for the purpose of grazing and collecting wood. We began to define its borders from the end part of the ravine that leads down to the road that goes from Tlos to Termessos by Oinoanda, and on this road we carved a border marker on a rock; from there going by the same road down to the common burial place and straight on to the so-called 'wooden Hermaion' 40 that is on the road; and from the Hermaion proceeding on the same road for about a hundred cubits, as the ravine leads to the right down to the river called Golbanounda; and upstream along the same river until the junction of the river and the ravine; and from there as the same ravine rises until the pass that leads from Termessos by Oinoanda up to the piles of Tlos; and from the pass turning towards the piles 50 and proceeding for about a hundred cubits to the ravine that leads down from the right until the river called Endyrēnos; and then following the course of the same river down to the rock situated at the junction of the river and the ravine, on which also we carved a boundary marker; and from this boundary marker as the same ravine rises proceeding for about a stade we carved a boundary marker on a rock; and from this boundary marker proceeding along the same ravine for about three plethra, we carved 60 a boundary marker on a rock; and from this boundary marker as the same ravine rises to the rocky place, we carved another boundary marker; and proceeding straight on from there we carved another boundary marker on a rock; and turning slightly to the right we carved another boundary marker; and from there to the road that leads to the (?) piles, which we went beyond for a short distance and carved another boundary marker; and going straight on from there we carved [a boundary marker] on the rock that is situated above the ravine; and from there going straight on as [(?) the ravine] rises to the . . . at the top, 70 we carved a boundary marker on a rock; and from this boundary marker advancing straight on for about a stade, we carved a boundary marker on a flat rock; and again from this boundary marker advancing straight on for about a stade, we carved a boundary marker on a flat rock; and from this boundary marker proceeding straight on for about a stade [to the . . .] of the rocky place, on which also we carved a boundary marker; and from there proceeding for about a plethron, we carved a boundary marker on a rock; and from there proceeding for about a stade we carved a boundary marker on a rock [which] is situated 80 next to the plateau; and from this boundary marker proceeding straight on for about three plethra we carved a boundary marker on a flat rock; and from there turning to the right and proceeding beyond the ridge for about three plethra we carved a boundary marker on a flat rock; and from this boundary marker proceeding for about a stade we carved a boundary marker on a flat rock; and from there going straight on to the ravine that lies on the left side, and as the ravine leads down until the road that leads from Tlos to Termessos by Oinoanda, 90 until the boundary marker from which we began to demarcate the land.

The accusations, concerning which the Lycians and the citizens of Termessos by Oinoanda were given the [people of] Knidos as an arbitrator by the senate, shall be cancelled; and no accusation shall remain, either from the Lycians against the citizens of Termessos by Oinoanda, or from the citizens of Termessos by Oinoanda against the Lycians, by any means.

The Lycians (?) shall bring twenty-five talents of Rhodian new plinthophoric silver money for the citizens of Termessos by Oinoanda.   100 If either of them does not abide by the aforesaid terms and infringes one of the terms, they shall pay to the side who does abide by the terms a penalty of a hundred talents of Rhodian new plinthophoric silver money; and their devices or innovations shall be invalid.

Four stone steles shall be set up, with this treaty inscribed on them:   one in the temple of Leto that is at Xanthos, one in the temple of Artemis at Tlos, one in the temple of Zeus at Termessos by Oinoanda, and the fourth at Kaunos, 110 in whichever temple they indicate.


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