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OGIS: 8


DECREES OF ERESOS CONCERNING AGONIPPOS AND OTHER TYRANTS

Greek text:   IG_12.2.526
Date:   c. 306 B.C.
Translated by: A. Ellis-Evans
Format:   see key to translations

This dossier of documents records a series of decisions by the city of Eresos, concerning the status of the children of their former tyrants. The last tyrant, Agonippos, was condemned in 332 B.C.; and later the children of the tyrants tried to gain the support of several kings (in approximately 324, 319 and 306 B.C.) to allow them to return to city, but in all cases the kings referred the final decision to the city.

For a recent discussion of the inscription, see A. Ellis-Evans, "The Tyrants Dossier from Eresos" ( Chiron, 2012 - academia.edu ). The translation is taken from there, with a few minor changes.


[D]   . . . to the . . . Alexander . . . meet with . . . Farewell.

The people decided: concerning those matters about which the council made a resolution . . . and the men who have been selected by a show of hands will procure all [that has been written] against the tyrants, both those who have lived in the city and their descendants, and they will carry the documents into the assembly. And since 10 previously King Alexander, having sent an ordinance {diagraphē}, commanded the Eresians to make a judgement regarding how Agonippos and Eurysilaos should be punished, [the people] in obedience with the ordinance set up a court in accordance with the laws which judged that Agonippos and Eurysilaos be put to death, and that their descendants be subject to the law on the stele, and that their property be sold in accordance with the law. And when, regarding Apollodoros and his brothers 20 Hermon and Hiraios (who previously had been tyrants of the city) as well as their descendants, Alexander sent a message that the people were to decide whether or not it would be good for them to return, the people in obedience with the ordinance convened a court for them in accordance with the law and the ordinance of King Alexander, which, once speeches had been given by both sides, decided that the law was valid and that they were to be exiled from the city. The people resolved: there shall be valid against the tyrants, both those who 30 lived in the city and their descendants, the law about the tyrants written on the old stele, and the ordinances of the kings against them, and the decrees previously written by our ancestors, and the ballot votes against the tyrants. But if contrary to these things any of the tyrants, either those who have lived in the city or their descendants, should be caught stepping foot on the territory of the Eresians, . . . the people shall deliberate and . . .

[A]   . . . he walled up those besieged on the acropolis, and he exacted 20,000 staters from the [citizens, and] he plundered the Greeks, and he tore down the altars to Zeus Philippios, and waged war on Alexander and the Greeks, and taking from the male citizens their weapons, he shut them all out of the city, while seizing their wives and their daughters and confining them to the acropolis, 10 he exacted 3,200 staters, and having plundered both the city and its temples with his pirates, he burnt them to the ground and incinerated the bodies of citizens along with them, and last of all, when he appeared before Alexander, he lied about and slandered the citizens. A sworn jury by secret ballot will try him for the death penalty. And if he is condemned to death, once Agonippos has made his counter–assessment, a second vote is to be carried out as to the manner in which he should die. 20 And if, once Agonippos has been condemned in the trial, anyone should recall any of Agonippos’ kin, or make a proposal about or bring forward for debate their return from exile or the restitution of their property, both he himself and that man’s family are to be accursed, and in addition let him be subject to the law for destroying the stele concerning the tyrants and their descendants. And a curse shall be made in the assembly at once that it may be well with one who judges and supports the city by a just vote, but for one who casts his vote contrary to justice the opposite of these things. 30 It was judged. 883 voters. Of these, 7 acquitted, but the rest condemned.

The people decided, concerning those matters about which the envoys report, the ones who had gone to Alexander and Alexander had sent back an ordinance: when the descendants of the previous tyrants, both Hiroidas the son of Tertikon the son of Hiraios and Agesimenes the son of Hermesides, had arrived before him and announced to Alexander that they were ready to undergo trial before the people regarding what they had been accused of; 40 [for good fortune] the people resolved: since . . .

[B]   He took away their weapons [and] he shut them all out of the city, and, having seized their wives and their daughters, these he confined to the acropolis and exacted 2,300 staters, and having plundered both 10 the city and its temples with his pirates, he burnt them to the ground and he incinerated the bodies of citizens along with them. Try him by secret ballot in accordance with the ordinance of King Alexander and the laws. And if he is condemned 20 to death, once Eurysilaos has made his counter-assessment, a second judgement is to be carried out by a show of hands as to the manner in which he should die. And the city will select 10 advocates {synagoroi}, who, having sworn an oath to Apollo Lykeios, shall together 30 speak on behalf of [the city] (?) as best they can.

[C]   [And a solemn prayer shall be made in the assembly at once that] it may be well with the one [who is] just and supports the city and the [laws] by a just vote and with their descendants, but the opposite for one who judges contrary to the laws and what is just. 10 The citizens who are to judge are to swear: "I shall judge the [case], so far as it lies within the [laws], according to the laws, and in other respects with great care and as well and as justly as possible, and I shall sentence, if I condemn, rightly and justly. So I shall do, 20 by Zeus and Helios".

From Philippos. The judgements against the exiles judged by Alexander, let them be valid, and of those who have been condemned to exile, let them remain exiled, but let them not be liable to seizure.

Prytany of Melidoros. 30 King Antigonos to the council and people of the Eresians, greetings. Your envoys came to us and presented your case, saying that the people, having received the letter from us which we had written on behalf of the sons of Agonippos, 40 had passed a decree, which the envoys read [to us], and . . . them . . .

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